Archive for nanotechnology

Moons, Stars and Sci-Fi Gadgets: GR Week in Review

Posted in Ghosts, Movies, Sci-Fi, Fantasy and Horror, Video, Weird News, Weird Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2009 by ghostradioworld

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A somewhat slow week at GR.  But here’s a quick overview:

We looked at all the uses of sci-fi gadget, another sci-fi gadget that’s becoming a reality,  and a famous actor who’s known for playing a character fond of sci-fi gadgets.

We examined some water on a distant moon, saw a famous mystery solved by a space vehicle which cannot reach even a local moon,  and a movie with box office headed to the moon.

We heard of a star-filled movie headed for blu-ray, a star-shaped UFO over Brazil, and a no-stars movie review.

If there’s something you want us to cover let us know.  Either talk about it in the comment section or send an email to ghostradioinfo@gmail.com.

It’s your blog just as much as it is ours.

Plus, if you need a copy of the GHOST RADIO the book this site is all about, you can order one here.

Size Matters: First Nanoscale Gear!

Posted in Weird Science with tags , , , on June 23, 2009 by ghostradioworld

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How small is small enough?  Well, according to nanotechnology expects you can’t get small enough.  Hmm … we wonder what their teenage years were like.  ;)

From Science Daily:

Scientists from A*STAR’s Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), led by Professor Christian Joachim,*  have scored a breakthrough in nanotechnology by becoming the first in the world to invent a molecular gear of the size of 1.2nm whose rotation can be deliberately controlled. This achievement marks a radical shift in the scientific progress of molecular machines and is published on 14 June 20009 in Nature Materials.

Said Prof Joachim, “Making a gear the size of a few atoms is one thing, but being able to deliberately control its motions and actions is something else altogether. What we’ve done at IMRE is to create a truly complete working gear that will be the fundamental piece in creating more complex molecular machines that are no bigger than a grain of sand.”

Prof Joachim and his team discovered that the way to successfully control the rotation of a single-molecule gear is via the optimization of molecular design, molecular manipulation and surface atomic chemistry. This was a breakthrough because before the team’s discovery, motions of molecular rotors and gears were random and typically consisted of a mix of rotation and lateral displacement.  The scientists at IMRE solved this scientific conundrum by proving that the rotation of the molecule-gear could be well-controlled by manipulating the electrical connection between the molecule and the tip of a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope while it was pinned on an atom axis.

For more on this story click here.

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